Tumblin' with Dr_Teng

  • other country: wow we solved drug crimes by doing this and the problem is practically completely resolved
  • america: there is just no stopping the war on drugs........
  • other country: we have the most successful schools because we implement these rules to encourage real learning
  • america: no hope....... kids just cant cut it anymore........
  • other country: gun related crime is all but non existent thanks to our restrictions
  • america: wow..... if only there was some way to stop these shootings before they happened..............
  • other country: nothing bad has happened as a result of our equal marriage/bathroom laws for lgbt
  • america: if only there was a way.............................

geekartgallery:

Illustrations by Simon Stålenhag

Welcome to rural Sweden, sometime in the late eighties. Citizens go about their mundane lives and children explore the countryside.  Only, in this version of Sweden, robots and hovercrafts are commonplace and decaying science facilities sprout from the harsh Scandinavian landscape.  There’s even a rumor that dinosaurs may have been resurrected by some failed experiment. This is the world that exists in artist Simon Stålenhag’s mind, and it’s only accessible through his paintings.

Simon Stålenhag is a Swedish concept artist. He’s worked on lots of media, from films, commercials and book covers to art directing and concepting for video games.

(Source: teksorbkyva)

geekartgallery:

Illustrations by Netherlands-based Michael Kus

The world we live in is cool, but Michael Kus brings it to a whole new level. Well he will…it’s not quite here yet. Mirror’s Edge, adding a whole new addition to a future sky line. With military powers to protect it powered by seals. The future is great and it’s the reason why I love Sci-Fi artists like Michael Kus. But it’s important to note that not all of Michael Kus’s artwork is of the future. He does many pieces containing fantasy. Now some could argue that Sci-Fi is fantasy… and it is! But personally I like the more techno style that Michael Kus has. Anyways I must be leaving now and I leave you with this last piece.

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though
why was there temporary internet
with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!
In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).
In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!

In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).

In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

(Source: neilcicierega, via blackpooled)

whatisthat-velvet:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

My SO was talking about this just now. They say there ain’t no jobs here but there’s always jobs in prison. He was working everyday to make $11 a month. They know what they’re doing.

whatisthat-velvet:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

My SO was talking about this just now. They say there ain’t no jobs here but there’s always jobs in prison. He was working everyday to make $11 a month. They know what they’re doing.

(via ardaharl)